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International Journal of Applied Dental Sciences
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P-ISSN: 2394-7489, E-ISSN: 2394-7497
ICV 2019: 92.11

2023, Vol. 9 Issue 3, Part C

Management of obliterated canal, periapical injury and cervical perforation

AUTHOR(S): MDS Zoila Delgadillo Delgadillo, Dr. Sue Helen García Hernández, MDS María Guadalupe Reyna Jiménez, DSC Ivonne Eleonora Campillo Amozurrutia, MDS Oscar Jaime López García, DSC Martha Margarita Aguado Arzola and DSC Claudia Alicia Meléndez Wong
ABSTRACT:
Introduction: Root canal obliteration is the result of accelerated dentin deposition within the root canal space. The American Association of Endodontics (AAE) classifies it as a high level of difficulty, since procedural errors may occur, such as perforation, which is the creation of a communication between the duct system and the periradicular tissues.
Clinical case: Female patient referred to the Endodontics graduate program with a "previously initiated" diagnosis. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed tooth # 12 with cervical perforation, obliterated canal, and periapical lesion. The perforation was sealed with Biodentine, the canal was located using a microscope, conductometry was taken with a #08K file and instrumented with ProTaper Next; it was irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Calcium hydroxide (CaOH2) with propylene glycol was placed as intracanal medication between each appointment before finishing. It was obturated with gutta-percha from the system and AH Plus sealer.
Discussion: McCabe and Dummer (2012) [1] determined that procedures on teeth with root canal obliteration should be limited to cases with symptomatic and/or radiographic signs of periapical pathology. Ingle et al. [2] (1985) found that the second most common reason for endodontic failure is root perforation. Although, depending on the size, location, type, time and sealing material, its prognosis can be modified.
Conclusion: Tooth perforation is the most common result of iatrogenic damage during endodontic access when attempting to locate an obliterated canal. The size, location, and time that elapses from the moment of the perforation and a good sealing with biomaterials help the success of the treatment.

Pages: 178-181  |  499 Views  194 Downloads


International Journal of Applied Dental Sciences
How to cite this article:
MDS Zoila Delgadillo Delgadillo, Dr. Sue Helen García Hernández, MDS María Guadalupe Reyna Jiménez, DSC Ivonne Eleonora Campillo Amozurrutia, MDS Oscar Jaime López García, DSC Martha Margarita Aguado Arzola, DSC Claudia Alicia Meléndez Wong. Management of obliterated canal, periapical injury and cervical perforation. Int J Appl Dent Sci 2023;9(3):178-181. DOI: https://doi.org/10.22271/oral.2023.v9.i3c.1805
International Journal of Applied Dental Sciences

International Journal of Applied Dental Sciences

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International Journal of Applied Dental Sciences